ComArtSci Offers New Executive Education Classes

Posted on: June 26, 2017

Starting this fall, ComArtSci will launch executive education classes for professionals, offering the latest in communication techniques for the workplace and their business. The program is seminar based and will be taught by first-class faculty, most of whom have been leaders in communication education for over 50-years. ExecEd Photo Wide

About the Courses

There will be six total courses, which will take place on the following dates:

Intergenerational Communication Conflict
Monday, September 11, 2017, from 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

This program is designed for mid to upper-level managers who work in a multi-generational workplace and want to understand the communication habits of each generation. Participants will identify the issues that cause intergenerational conflict and learn how to overcome the generational divide.

Communicating Stress in the Workplace
Monday, September 25, 2017, from 12:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

This program is designed for mid to upper-level managers who want to understand more about what causes stress and how stress is communicated within the workplace.

Conflict Management
Monday, October 9, 2017, from 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

This program is designed for mid- to upper-level managers who want to understand how to manage and mitigate conflict in the workplace. In addition, this course will assist managers in identifying the tendencies of an individual’s decision making in groups and how to avoid a conflict when there are opposing opinions.

Working and Communicating as a Team
Monday, October 23, 2017, from 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

This program is designed for mid- to upper-level managers who want to understand the best-practices for creating and enabling effective and efficient teams within their workplace. A 4-step approach to teamwork and team-building will be discussed to help facilitate a culture of teamwork.

Effective Management and Leadership Communication
Wednesday, November 8, 2017, from 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

This program is designed for mid to upper-level managers who want to identify the communications styles of effective management and leadership with added content on how to interpret verbal and nonverbal messages.

Performance Feedback
Monday, December 4, 2017, from 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

This program is designed for mid- to upper-level managers determined to gain or enhance the communication skills needed to give quality performance reviews to employees. This program will enable participants to effectively communicate to employees what they are doing well and where they need improvement.

Join the Program

In each session, ComArtSci professionals will work hand in hand with you and your employees to boost effective communication in the workplace. Executives will leave this program re-energized, with a new perspective on their strengths and weaknesses, and new communication skills that will drastically change their company’s work environment for the better. 

Though each class stands alone, participants can pick and choose which ones they would like to take. Each seminar is designed to be educational and instructional, and all work will take place within the class setting. Lunch will also be provided after each morning class and before each afternoon class.

For questions, or to register for a class, please email cas.execed@msu.edu, visit cas.msu.edu/execed or call 517-432-1124.

By Katie Kochanny

Share via these networks:
facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailfacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

ComArtSci Professor Researches Media’s Influence on Teens

Posted on: June 8, 2017

Morgan_Ellithorpe_WideMorgan Ellithorpe, assistant professor of advertising and public relations at ComArtSci, partnered with colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania to study how risky behaviors portrayed in the media, such as alcohol and tobacco use, sex and violence, are repeated by teenagers.

Take for example, shows like Empire, Narcos and Game of Thrones. Ellithorpe said teenagers see their favorite characters drinking alcohol, doing drugs and/or being violent in multiple episodes and come to think that this is normal behavior.

“My job is to figure out which adolescents are more likely to repeat the risky behaviors they see in the media, what kinds of media are more or less likely to influence behavior and what we can do to decrease the likelihood that these kinds of things will transfer from media to adolescent behavior,” Ellithorpe said.

Media Consumption Differences Across Racial and Ethnic Lines

Ellithorpe and her colleagues have published several research papers on the issue and she presented on the topic at the 67th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association (ICA). Ellithorpe said their research has shown that there are racial and ethnic differences in media consumption.

“We know that black, Hispanic and white adolescents watch different kinds and amounts of media, and the media they watch portrays different risk behaviors to different extents,” Ellithorpe said.

For example, Ellithorpe and her colleagues have found that black youth watch more media than their Hispanic or white counterparts and the shows they watch are more likely to include black characters, who are more likely to be involved in sex and alcohol use than white characters. Despite these facts, the team has found that black teenagers seem to be less influenced by media than white teenagers.

Ellithorpe said that, in the past, similar studies did not include media that was relevant to black teenagers, such as television shows with black characters. However, even with the inclusion of this type of media, she has found that black teenagers still show lower levels of media influence than white teenagers. Ellithorpe challenges future research to confirm these findings and help solve the puzzle.

Research Findings Consistent with the CDC

The researchers have also found that drinking alcohol before or during sexual intercourse is common among adolescents and young adults, which is consistent with similar findings by the CDC.

The combination of alcohol use and sexual behavior is the most common behavioral risk combination in television and movies,” Ellithorpe said. “We know that drinking alcohol before sexual behavior increases sexual risk taking and susceptibility to accidental pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, so it is really important to understand the who, when and why of this behavior.”

Hope for the Future

Ellithorpe hopes that her research will positively impact the lives of young people.

“I hope that stakeholders in adolescent health and wellbeing —  from policy-makers to health organizations to physicians and parents — will be able to use this information gleaned from our research to reduce the negative impacts of mediated risk on adolescent behavior,” Ellithorpe said.

In the future, Ellithorpe hopes to explore the role of social media on influencing adolescent behavior.

“Adolescents and young adults are very often posting on social media about television content and we are exploring the possibility that this social media posting could be a way to intervene in the negative influence of television risk behavior,” Ellithorpe said.

Additionally, Ellithorpe hopes to see more research in the area of media targeted at specific racial and ethnic groups, such as Spanish-language programming.

“This is a growing area of scholarship that really needs more research to understand how this media is different from mainstream media, who is watching these kinds of media and the influence exposure to this kind of media has on cognition and behavior,” Ellithorpe said.

By Rianna N. Middleton

Share via these networks:
facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailfacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Bob Albers prepares for retirement from MSU, premieres film at CCFF

Posted on: April 18, 2017

MSU Media Sandbox photography exercise; with Zydecrunch, performing atop the Comm Arts & Sciences parking ramp. 9/17/12. photo: w.r. richards/CAS-MSU

After a 35-year career teaching at MSU’s College of Communication Arts and Sciences in the Department of Media and Information, Senior Video Specialist Bob Albers will retire after the current spring semester.

Albers teaches one of the Communication Arts and Sciences classes that many ComArtSci students choose to take as a part of their degree programs. The course is called Story, Sound and Motion, which explores the central role of storytelling, sound and editing in media communication. That being said, the number of students that have had the opportunity to learn from Albers reaches into the thousands. He has had a particular impact on students who have taken his documentary capstone class. In fact, last year, a film produced by students in Albers’ class, From Flint: Voices of a Poisoned City, earned entrance into several film festivals and even won a Student Academy Award.

Before he retires, Albers has been able to cherish the relationships and connections made during his time at the college. The department recently celebrated the sixth Albies Awards, an Oscar-like awards ceremony recognizing students for their work in production and film. It simultaneously commemorates Albers and his name for the impact he has had on the program.

At this year’s Albies, Albers was celebrated with a plaque from the students, “It was one of those bittersweet things. I think, ‘Why am I leaving? I’ve got this group that I’m a part of that I am still connected with and I can tell they care about me’ ... So, I’ll miss that.”

Celebrating his craft and most recent film

You have likely experienced that moment when you’re doing the thing you love and you enter this state of being where you’re absorbed in the action or performance, commonly referred to as being “in the zone.” Albers’ recent documentary film, Chasing the Moment, follows 11 individuals who have experienced those moments and continue to seek them out in their lives every day.

The film features a chef, a marine sniper, a pulitzer prize-winning photographer, dancers, an Olympic Silver Medalist and more. It recently premiered at the Capital City Film Festival in Lansing on April 8. 

“(The film is) about how do you get to that place where everything goes away and you’re not thinking about anything, you’re just being whatever it is that you do,” said Albers.

Like the people in his film, Albers said he has experienced this sensation, too. Before entering the classroom, he was a college basketball player at Bellarmine University in Louisville, Kentucky, where he studied psychology. He said the feeling was present as an athlete, but it also happened later when he picked up the classical guitar and when he went to art school to study sculpture and photography, too.

Throughout the course of his life, he’s been a teacher of various subjects and crafts, including teaching science to junior high school students, giving guitar lessons and, today, mentoring and educating future directors, editors and other industry professionals about all aspects of film and documentaries.

Albers’ teaching went beyond the classroom during the 4.5-years of production for Chasing the Moment. He selected a handful of MSU students and two faculty members to assist him.

“Some of them were involved in the shooting (process) and so I feel as if that’s a window into the professional world for those people,” said Albers. “They get to do classes, but then they get to work on a big project."

The 2016 Albies attended by over 200 members of Telecasters, alumni, staff and guest. 04/23/2016. Photo Credit: Amanda Pinckney

Leaving a legacy

Albers’ ability to connect with his students dates back to the 90s when Bob Gould, a professor in the School of Journalism, was a student of Albers’. When Gould later returned to ComArtSci as a professor, he said Albers was a friendly face to see walking the halls.

“The first semester teaching here, I leaned on him a little to get some professional advice, but every time I would see him in the ComArtSci building, I would smile and was a bit nostalgic. In fact, even today, 10 years later, I still feel that way when I see him or talk to him,” said Gould. “He had that kind of impact on me and so many other students. His kind soul and quiet demeanor always creates a calming effect when stress levels are high. I’m sad to see him retire, but it is so well deserved.”

Gould said one of the last things he did as a student at ComArtSci was create a small documentary as an independent study with Albers. Now, 30 years later, Gould’s daughter, Ilene, a freshman media and information student at MSU, is doing the exact same thing.

“He knows how to teach creative, out-of-the-box thinking and I’ve definitely learned better ways to approach storytelling," said Ilene. "He’s just a genuine and kind person and shows a lot of care for his craft, but most importantly for his students."

His daughter’s work with Albers has impressed Gould and he is happy to know she had the chance to learn from one of the greats.

“When I heard Bob might be retiring, I told my daughter that she should take an independent study with him and learn as much as she can from him. I thought it would be a really cool thing for two generations to share that special mentorship,” said Gould.

Just as Gould and his daughter have enjoyed learning from him, Albers has taken equal joy from teaching, “I really do like teaching a lot and I enjoy being around young people. You know they say it keeps you young, but I don’t think that’s true, maybe a little bit younger than you would be if you weren’t involved with young people. They see the world differently than I do, maybe clearer in some ways than someone like me does. That’s a thrill.”

What’s next?

Albers, a Kentucky native, looks forward to moving back to his home state after 37 years away to build a home with his wife and “get to know Louisville again,” especially through his photography.

By Savannah Swix

 

Share via these networks:
facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailfacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Communication Senior Selected as Speaker at 2017 Convocation

Posted on: April 10, 2017
Matt_photo

Matthew St. Germain

Graduation day is an experience that college students think about often – whether it be with excitement for the future or perhaps a fear of the unknown. However, before they cross the stage and turn their tassels, some of the university’s finest representatives offer them words of wisdom as they transition to alumni and seek refuge in the real world.

One of those people is Matthew St. Germain, a communication senior from the College of Communication Arts and Sciences and this year’s Convocation Student Speaker for the Class of 2017.

Selected by the Associated Students of Michigan State University among other student applicants, St. Germain hopes to give the graduating class, family and friends a very “Matt-like” speech, he said.

“People can expect some pensive thoughts tempered with a little goofiness and inspiration. My hope is to make this significant life event even more enjoyable and memorable, and to send my fellow students off with an encouraging ‘hoorah!’” said St. Germain. “It is an honor to represent the graduating Class of 2017, and I hope to give a speech worthy of their world-class accomplishments.”

St. Germain is heavily involved in university life as a member of the University Academic Hearing Board, an undergraduate researcher, an intern at the MSU Federal Credit Union, a previous member of the Spartan Marching Band, RHS Representative as well as an apprentice of the University Carillonneur at Beaumont Tower.

“My co-workers know me as ‘Smiley,’ and I do my best to learn something new every day. I try to live very intentionally, and be grateful for the smallest things in life. I believe every moment of every day is an opportunity to demonstrate leadership and be the change you wish to see in others, and ultimately, the world,” said St. Germain. “I am never afraid to be my goofy self, but I also work extremely hard to demonstrate love and kindness to all. It may be cheesy, but I believe that something as simple as a genuine smile has the potential to turn someone's life around.”

He hopes to someday take his talents and enthusiasm into a future of helping others as a member of the Peace Corps or possibly working in developing countries on community and environmental sustainability. His goals might even provoke him to consider running for elected office, he said. St. Germain will enroll for the Linked Bachelor’s-Master’s Program in Communication with a specialization in Non-Profit Fundraising in the Fall of 2017.

Michigan State University’s Spring Convocation ceremony will take place on Friday, May 5 at 1 p.m. at the Breslin Center in East Lansing.

By Savannah Swix

Share via these networks:
facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailfacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Film by MSU professor and WKAR producer to air on PBS

Posted on: April 7, 2017

LATIN MUSIC USA (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

A groundbreaking documentary on Latin Music from WKAR producer and Michigan State University professor John Valadez will air nationally in primetime on PBS this May.

His film, The Chicano Wave, is the third hour in a four-part series, called Latin Music USA. This entertaining and insightful documentary dives deep into the history of Mexican American music to showcase how the Latino culture is a part of all of us. Featured in Valadez’ film are musicians and performers like Selena, Ritchie Valens, Los Lobos, Linda Ronstadt and more.

John Valadez

John Valadez

“In America, we are all interconnected in ways that are complicated, often subtle, unseen, and unarticulated, and so this series, Latin Music USA, that’s kind of what it’s about. It’s about making unexpected connections that are actually very beautiful and surprising,” said Valadez. “The show is about music, but in a sense it is really America. It’s about what it means to be American.”

Valadez believes a film like this would not have been possible without the expertise and thoughtful research of scholars from Chicano/Latino Studies Programs like the one at MSU’s College of Social Science. He states, “You do not get something like Latin Music USA unless there are dedicated folks writing the books; unless there are people exploring and elucidating the history; unless there are talented musicologists who are placing it in context.”  

Valadez has often been called “the hardest working Chicano in the Doc Biz,” and in this case the dedication has certainly paid off. The series will be shown on primetime national television in May, with Valadez’ film broadcast on May 5 on PBS at 9 p.m. – Cinco de Mayo.

In addition to his role with WKAR, Valadez has joint appointments as professor of practice with the Department of Media and Information and the Film Studies Program at MSU.

Share via these networks:
facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailfacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

MSU Game Design Ranks among Princeton Review’s Top 20 and #1 in Big Ten

Posted on: April 3, 2017

One day, you’re at home playing your favorite video game after school. The next, you’re stepping into a classroom to learn how to design the next generation’s go-to game.

With a brand new multi-million dollar media space and technically-skilled faculty, Game Design students at Michigan State University are receiving an education that ranks among the Princeton Review's top 20 and number one in the Big Ten conference.

At number 10 for undergraduate programs, and with a graduate program right behind that at number 11 in a separate ranking for graduate schools, MSU is making its presence known.

We have made significant investments in our program in the last year including hiring three new games faculty, creation of the interactive media and motion capture studio and revising our curriculum within Media and Information to add several new game art and design courses,” said Brian Winn, director of undergraduate studies and an associate professor in the Department of Media and Information.

gelStudents who enroll in classes for the game design program, housed in the College of Communication Arts and Sciences, come from a variety of majors including studio art, computer science and engineering as well as media and information.

“Our program is very interdisciplinary,” said Winn. “Students collaborate on teams (in classes), assuming the role most closely related to their major, to build game projects. This gives them a very authentic game making experience that closely resembles the real-world.”

The program and its courses enable students to graduate with priceless knowledge, which translates into an impressive portfolio of creative work completed as classwork or for external clients.

The curriculum offers students the option to work with both games for entertainment and serious games. Johannes Bauer, chair of the Department of Media and Information, explained that serious games are strong at the graduate level.

He added that the program’s students show immense talent for furthering the industry, “The students have a very deep knowledge in game design and game development. Some of them come from more of a creative side, others come from a technical and programming side. Our curriculum offers them both opportunities.”

With spaces like the Games for Entertainment and Learning Lab and the recently opened Immersive Media Studio, fit with the technology to design and produce virtual reality gaming experiences, the program at Michigan State University continues to help students use and build upon their individual skill sets and support them to excel in their future careers.

For Peter Burroughs, media and information senior, the program has taught him new ways to evolve his talent for traditional art that he discovered in high school and apply it to 3D modeling, concept art painting, visual effects, art direction, project management and asset implementation. In addition, he says the program has to work with others and to embrace the skills and contributions they bring to the team.

“The professors and upperclassmen have taught me an incredible amount about making video games, and my peers in the program have become like family to me,” said Burroughs. “Working together during all-nighters will do that to you!”

By Savannah Swix

Share via these networks:
facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailfacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

ADDY Awards 2017

Posted on: March 23, 2017

addys3

And the ADDY goes to…

Each year, young creatives from the College of Communication Arts and Sciences submit their work in the hopes of winning an ADDY Award. The annual award ceremony is organized by the American Advertising Federation and the Mid-Michigan Creative Alliance and recognizes students and professionals for their work in TV, print, design and digital.

Above: Ad created by Madison Johnson for her brand "Bad Habits Brewing Company," won her a Gold ADDY and Judge’s Choice award. She won 11 awards in total.

The submitted works were judged by a panel of professional advertising creatives, including Andy Azula, the creative director and vice president at The Martin Agency in Richmond, Virginia; Silver Guellar III, from Van Winkle + Associates in Atlanta, Georgia; and Melanie Wiesenthal, a partner at Deerfield, a branding and design studio that focuses on fashion and beauty in Brooklyn, New York.

Eric Schwartz, advertising senior and Silver ADDY winner, looks forward to the ADDYs each year, as they promote and reward students in the MSU Department of Advertising + Public Relations and local professionals for their hard work.

The ADDYs to me is such a great way to celebrate the work that students do in and outside of the classroom, and the hard work that professionals are doing in the industry just down the road,” said Schwartz. “The students in the creative concentration within the advertising program are small and few, so having an event to celebrate and bring all of us together is really special – it’s a family reunion of sorts.”

This year’s entries included ads for Fruit of the Loom, Walgreens, Best Buy as well as companies and brands created by the students.

Above: Ad created by Madison Johnson, won a Gold ADDY for TV Advertising and an Excellence in Diversity award.

Students stole the show with stunning work

Recent advertising grad Lauren Cutler was awarded a Gold ADDY for work on a brand she created called Lumberjane, with fellow student Matt Richter. The brief they were given was to create packaging and advertising for a brewing company – for women, by women. Cutler also won a Judge’s Choice award for the brand, which she was excited to receive from judge Andy Azula.

lumberjaneThis year's ADDYs was really wonderful. The student work was exceptional, even compared to last year's,” said Cutler. “The most rewarding part of the whole experience is seeing your classmates and friends be recognized for the awesome stuff they do and to celebrate all our hard work together!”

A total of 60-plus awards were given to students in MSU’s Advertising + Public Relations program this year. However, if this were the Olympics, senior Madison Johnson would be Michael Phelps. She left the ADDYs as the most decorated student of all time. With 11 awards, ranging in color from Bronze to Gold and a Judge’s Choice, Johnson said she felt very lucky.

The awards I am most proud of are my Judge’s Choice and Best in Show for Bad Habits Brewing,” said Johnson. “I created the project over the summer in the Intensive Portfolio Workshop with Henry Brimmer and Lou Schiavone, but kept working on it afterward which is something that I should do with all my projects. Because I spent so much time on it, refining and adding, it was really great to get recognized for the hard work.”

Another honorable mention includes Tiffany Nagy’s “Coming Out” film trailer, which won gold for Television Advertising.

Above: Ad created by Tiffany Nagy, won gold for Television Advertising.

Celebrating creative work

Ross Chowles, professor of practice in the MSU Department of Advertising + Public Relations, compared having an ADDY award on a resume as “ringing a bell” that the student has something special about them.

You could have a nice portfolio, but having an award starts to ring a little bell that this person is different,” said Chowles. “More important, I guess, is that competitive spirit, that belief in their work. The problem with our business is it’s all of gut feel. It helps
acknowledge your gut feel when someone says ‘Yeah, it’s great’, but even then, it’s the judges’ opinions.”

A Gold ADDY allows the winner entrance into a regional competition and, depending on performance, potentially entered at the national level. We wish our Gold ADDY winning students the best of luck in the upcoming competitions!

View all of the ADDY Award entries on the Mid-Michigan Creative Alliance’s website.

 

Share via these networks:
facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailfacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

ComArtSci Faculty and Alumni Rank Top 5 in AEJMC Competition

Posted on: March 20, 2017

fountain-pen-1851096_1280The votes are in! Two research teams of faculty and alumni from the College of Communication Arts and Sciences came out on top in a quest to receive the 2016 JMCQ Outstanding Research Article Award from the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

The ComArtSci faculty team includes Brendan Watson, professor in the School of Journalism, and Steve Lacy, professor emeritus in the School of Journalism. The two were recognized for their article “Three Decades of Reliability in Communication Content Analyses: Reporting of Reliability Statistics and Coefficient Levels in Three Top Journals.” The article details their study of “reliability reporting in content analysis articles in three flagship communication journals.”

The second team includes alumni Brian Bowe, Ph.D. in journalism and media and information, and Jennifer Hoewe, M.A. in journalism. Their work, “Night and Day: An Illustration of Framing and Moral Foundations in the Oklahoma Shariah Amendment Campaign,” studied the “constitutional amendment banning judicial use of the Islamic moral code called ‘Shariah Law,’” and how moral foundations shaped people’s opinions about it.

The individual articles for the two teams of researchers were nominated for the 2016 JMCQ Outstanding Research Article Award and made it to the top five. The articles are now in the running for the outstanding article winner, which will be announced in the coming months by the AEJMC.

To mark their award, the winning articles are now available to read for free until March 31, 2017.

Share via these networks:
facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailfacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

MSU Science Festival Features Research Event led by ComArtSci Faculty

Posted on: March 13, 2017

science-festival--1

Grab your lab coat and put on your goggles. It’s time for the annual MSU Science Festival, April 7- 23 in various locations throughout the state of Michigan. The festival offers a multi-day experience filled with hands-on activities and demonstrations, tours, open houses and so much more.

Check out this year’s schedule and decide what you’d like to see. Explore the MSU greenhouses and learn how to identify plants in Michigan. Discover the importance of clean water and see those affected by the Flint Water Crisis through the work of artist Jan Tichy at the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum. And if you would like to learn more about the coffee brewing process or discover something new about the trees around MSU's campus, you’re sure to find a workshop, presentation or activity close by. Finally, don’t miss out on presentations from faculty and staff from the College of Communication Arts and Sciences.

The Science of Effective Communication

Do you want to  to learn more about the science of communication and what it means to communicate effectively?

Three professors from the College of Communication Arts and Sciences will talk about their research through the event “3 in 30: The Science of Communication”, April 9 from 7 to 9 p.m. at Dublin Square.

Presenters are Kjertsin Thorson, assistant professor of advertising and public relations; Dave Ewoldsen, a professor in the Department of Media and Information; and Jingbo Meng, assistant professor of communication. They will each briefly share the details of their latest research before opening the floor for discussion and questions.

Facebook and Politics. Have you ever used Facebook to talk politics? Thorson’s research covers how people share news and information on the popular social media site and studies their willingness to discuss politics through Facebook.

The Effects of Playing Video Games. Ewoldsen’s research targets why people like to play violent video games cooperatively. He will tell more about the results, which show an increase in pro-social behavior during and after play.

Monitoring Health with Mobile Devices. Meng will share the progress of her research about using technology and mobile devices to assist clinicians and health professionals with counseling services for college students. She will discuss the results of interviews with clinicians and describe the behavioral monitoring technology being developed for the project

For more information about the MSU Science Festival, click here.

Share via these networks:
facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailfacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Elizabeth LaPensee receives Serious Games Community Leadership Award

Posted on: March 8, 2017


elizabethElizabeth LaPensee, an assistant professor in the Department of Media and Information, was recently recognized by the International Game Developers Association (IGDA) Serious Games Special Interest Group for her dedication to advocacy and “reaching new communities through serious games.” LaPensee was honored with the 2017 Serious Games Community Leadership Award. She accepted the award in San Francisco, California on March 1.

LaPensee is known for her work with indigenous communities, contributing her talents as a designer, artist, and writer to several games with focuses on promoting language and cultural traditions. Recent releases include Mikan, a mobile game for passing on her language; Manoominike, a motion game about ricing; and Coyote Quest, a game for sharing indigenous science. She also designed the game Honour Water, which brings attention to threats to water and using singing as a way of healing.

Share via these networks:
facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailfacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail