Junior Strengthens Audio Interest Through Student Organizations, New York Field Experience and Music

Posted on: April 21, 2017

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Over spring break on the New York Field Experience trip through the College of Communication Arts and Sciences, Arthur Jones, media and information junior, was not only able to observe audio, video and music industries individually, but he was also able to see his interests work together in the media industry as a whole.

His interest in audio started his senior year of high school, when he took a class with someone who owned a local recording studio.

“I knew I liked to play music and thought the class looked neat at first, but I happened to really like the recording aspect of the class,” Jones said.

The one visit that Jones found particularly interesting during the New York City Field Experience was the group’s stop at MTV.

“We learned how important their social media teams are,” Jones said. “Because their demographic is early to late teens, they constantly have to stay up-to-date with new app trends. Whenever something new comes out, they have to learn how to best apply it to their audience.”

The biggest thing he learned from alumni on the trip was the fact that, in college, you never truly know what city you will end up in.

He also learned a lot about careers in the audio industry.

“I knew New York was a big media market, but I really learned so many valuable pieces of information related to all things audio,” said Jones. “Whether it’s in TV or radio, doing something in audio would be my dream job.”

The market in New York City made Jones aware of potential job opportunities.

“I definitely am more open now and saw the possibilities of different careers in the media industry,” Jones said. “The New York trip really broadened the potential I saw in the different jobs I could do.”

A change in tune

Jones first came to MSU as a student in the James Madison College. When he discovered that he wasn’t passionate about what he was studying, he left MSU to study at a community college in his hometown. He pursued a music degree and learned how to play an instrument – the double bass. When he returned to MSU, he decided to major in media and information with a minor in music.

“Even though there aren’t a ton of audio classes, MSU has so many students making student-films and other projects as well,” Jones said. “I was pulled into the fiction film class and Theatre 2 Film. I also work at Recording Services in the music building.”

In addition to all of those commitments to expanding his craft, Jones also plays in the concert orchestra at MSU.

Valuable skills learned

Jones doesn’t regret taking the time away from MSU to learn what he wanted to do. He said the experience was “valuable.”

“I thought I wanted to do international relations, but I realized the reason why was to be on NPR,” he said. “It’s still a dream job of mine to work on an NPR special, but I feel like I can accomplish that with what I am doing. By leaving and coming back, it made me very secure in what I want to do.”

His advice?

Jones suggests if students don’t know what they want to do, to think about an interest and pursue it more.

“You have to think, ‘Could I do this for years?’” Jones said. “College is the time to figure out your interests and experiment with those interests. At MSU, there are so many clubs, which makes it fun and easy to try out anything and everything.”

By Meg Dedyne

 

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Communication junior to spend summer interning at BCPM in New York City

Posted on: April 14, 2017

New York City is like a second home for communication junior Allie Baer. Having traveled to the city almost every year since she was young will make her summer internship position with BCPM a smooth transition. BCPM is a global public relations agency, specializing in brand building and communications in New York City.

“I thrive in fast-paced environments and am thrilled Allie Baerfor this opportunity,” said Baer.

Baer’s personal and professional connections enabled her the chance to interview with the company over the phone. Just a few days later, she was offered the position, which she excitedly accepted.

“I can’t wait to be a part of such an outstanding agency,” Baer said. “I knew BCPM was a top public relations agency and it was started by two strong women, which really appealed to me. They offered me a position in the fashion department, so I am excited to learn more about that industry as well.”

Baer admires how the company got its start. She said it shows women choosing their career paths and pursuing what they want to do.

“Their client list spoke volumes for me,” Baer said. “BCPM works with high-level clients, including fashion and travel. I’ve been interested in both of these industries as it relates to public relations and now I will get to learn from professionals how these industries work.”

She describes this internship as her first real-world experience.

“I’m on my own at MSU, but this experience will be different,” Baer said. “I will be working and living on my own, which is exciting and scary all at the same time.”

How she started the search process

Baer started networking and applying for internships earlier this fall to get ahead of the summer internship season. At the time, she was a part of a course that met for two hours on Fridays, facilitated by Karin Hanson and Rachel Ruis. Each week, they brought in MSU alumni to speak to the class and offer advice about the networking process, the importance of attending career fairs and industry insight.

“They told us to not be afraid to reach out,” Baer said. “Talk to people, learn about what they do. A lot of their advice was about trying new things and how to use LinkedIn effectively, as well.”

Baer used LinkedIn to look for internships and find alumni at companies she wanted to work at. Now, she’s using LinkedIn to find her peers she will be working with this summer at BCPM.

Her advice?

“Don’t be afraid to reach out,” Baer said. “Spartans are always willing to help you. Don’t give up. I started applying in September and I just accepted this internship within the past month. Everything happens for a reason. Once I interviewed with BCPM, the process took only six days. So don’t give up and don’t get down on yourself. Always keep trying.”

By Meg Dedyne

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ComArtSci freshman visits New York City through Field Experience course

Posted on: April 6, 2017

ashleyreedJournalism freshman Ashley Reed wasted no time gaining experience in the media industry.  She spent her first college spring break touring New York City with fellow classmates on the NYC Field Experience - Media Production trip with the College of Communication Arts and Sciences. ComArtSci offers six different field experiences designed to help students explore career options and network in their field.

“This trip was a huge eye-opener for me as a freshman, because I wasn’t completely sure of what I wanted to do when I came to MSU,” Reed said. “But going to New York put things into perspective for me and helped me see that I can pursue the dreams that I have.”

The trip took students to various media companies, ranging from coverage of music, radio, video — you name it. They met with executives that work in the business, as well as Spartan alums, who explained day-to-day life as professionals in the city.

A love for media at a young age

Growing up, Reed knew that she wanted to be involved in the media industry. She always imagined having her own television show. She decided that majoring in journalism would allow her to explore all of her media interests.

“My favorite part of the trip was seeing people do what they love,” Reed said. “I know in my family, most people who did or didn’t go to college, aren’t doing what they love to do. Going on this trip, I am now more hopeful that I can do what I love to do, especially going as a freshman and knowing I will still have more guidance.”

When Reed was around eight years old, she started singing and songwriting. She began with short stories, which turned into poetry, which turned into songs.

“After I started doing this, I just wanted to keep creating more things,” Reed said. “I really opened up and wanted to know what else I could create. I started making little music videos and getting into cameras. Everything I created, I had to figure it out by myself.”

Her senior year of high school, Reed started The Belle Society, which is a women empowerment group. She started the social media pages for the society and produced videos and facilitated photo shoots, too.

“This is where I self-taught and learned how to do most of this stuff. This society was also a way for my peers and me to lift each other up,” Reed said. “My love for all things media came in high school.”

Seeing opportunity in the city

Reed says she would love to be the female version of Ryan Seacrest one day. In fact, her biggest take-away from the trip was that dreams like this one are actually possible.

“One of the most memorable moments from that trip was meeting an alum that now works at MTV,” Reed said. “It was great to hear how he started as an intern and then came back to work full time.”

The students also visited an alumnus that is working as a news reporter at ABC News. He allowed the students to come back and watch his team in action.

Reed said it was great to be around media professionals and to see MSU alumni making an impact in such a large city.

If she could do anything, she would want to be a singer, songwriter, television personality and producer — she would do it all.

“I love hosting and producing videos, but sometimes it’s hard for me to just focus on one thing,” Reed said. “The possibilities and options of the media industry have always just grabbed my interest.”

By Meg Dedyne

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Leadership in Sales Program Led Advertising Senior to Internships and Full-Time Position

Posted on: March 30, 2017

laneshaAdvertising management senior Lanesha Davis has had two sales internships during her college career and already has a full-time job lined up after graduation. She credits a lot of her success to the opportunities she was given through being a part of the sales minor leadership program in the College of Communication Arts and Sciences.

“The sales minor leadership program is not only a way to develop yourself professionally in sales, but also to develop real-world experience,” Davis said. “I learned how to network and the program offers the chance to compete in an actual sales competition.”

Davis is the event coordinator for the Global Sales Leadership Society, therefore she was responsible for organizing the competition, as well as competing herself. The event itself hosts about 80 students and about 20 different companies.

One of Davis’ sales internships was this past summer at Delphi Automotive where she worked on their sales team. Davis’ role was to work on the Ford team to acquire new business leads.

Davis worked on a team with other interns to come up with new onboarding ideas for new hires in the sales industry. While working on this project, she analyzed data to maximize profitability and was also able to attend some classes on selling techniques and gaining strategic people skills.

“My favorite task was definitely the onboarding project,” Davis said. “I was able to be one of the leaders for that project and it was cool having the goal of increasing new hire retention rates.”

Another internship that Davis completed was with the Enterprise Rent-A-Car located at the Detroit airport.

“Enterprise was very hands on and I was actually responsible for doing the same tasks that a full-time employee would do, which was a great experience,” Davis said. “ Enterprise was very fast pace, as we did transactions daily. It was a great opportunity to experience different paces throughout my two internships.”

Davis currently works in the human resources department at MSU and has just accepted a full-time position as a business management associate at General Mills.

How did she decide to work in sales?

“I would say I am a people person and I love a challenge,” Davis said. “Being able to interact with different people and achieve new goals daily is something that got me interested in sales.”

Davis enjoys the people she works with in the industry, as well as the chance to network with people that have the same interest in sales that she has.

Advice?

“Get involved in leadership roles and experiences outside of the classroom,” Davis said. “Those are the skills that will set you apart from others.”

By Meg Dedyne

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Journalism student interns at KOFY-TV in San Francisco

Posted on: March 24, 2017

leeThis past summer, journalism senior Cynthia Lee accepted an internship with a local TV station in San Francisco called KOFY-TV. She was able to use interview and networking techniques she learned at MSU to prepare for and obtain the internship.

Lee was the station’s only intern, covering promotions and productions. She learned how the television market works and how the industry is changing. She also gained a better understanding of just how important teamwork is, especially in times of change.

“I gained so many valuable skills through my internship, especially being on the other side of the country and having to figure out everything on my own,” Lee said. “For example, I didn’t have design experience, so I just had the mindset of being willing to learn and work hard.”

Being the only intern at the station, Lee had to learn how to connect with and target a different demographic. She used this opportunity to learn from others at the station, who had years of experience.

Lee said her favorite project was helping out with the productions for the Pride Parade in San Francisco.

“It was really different and fun,” Lee said. “We had to stay up for hours to create notecards by hand, but to have had the chance to watch and help out with live events was really cool.”

Her internship helped her to discover what she does and doesn't want to do in her future career.

“I really like being in front of the camera,” Lee said. “I recommend letting the right people at your internship know the intentions of what you want to gain from the internship and to take control of your own learning experience. I wanted to build up my reel, and I told them this. You just also have to be prepared to prove yourself.”

Production appeals more to Lee, as she likes to be active and in the field. She found that working on promotions is more office work, but she is grateful for having both of those experiences in one internship.

“I also learned how life would be post-college and if I got a job out-of-state,” Lee said. “I would be commuting to work every day and I would be in a new area. Learning how to start fresh somewhere and how to adapt was great. It wouldn’t be so scary if I had to do that again.”

Since her internship, Lee has been working to continue to improve her skills through projects.

“I like productions and producing a lot,” Lee said. “I am creating a web series right now and trying to finish that up, as I want to have it done by April.”

The web series is based on her friend group’s experiences in college.

When considering internships and job opportunities, Lee suggests that you express to yourself, and even to the people you’d work with, what skills you are looking to build and what experiences you’d like to have.

“I would just really emphasize to be clear on what you want to gain when you obtain an internship,” Lee said. “Especially when you do phone interviews, always sound enthusiastic; pay attention to those little details about yourself. Above all, use all of the opportunities and resources MSU has to offer.”

By Meg Dedyne

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ComArtSci Senior Combines Passions During Internship at Lettuce Live Well

Posted on: March 17, 2017

During her first two years out of high school, media and information senior Eman Hubbard was a collegiate athlete. When she transferred to Michigan State University for her junior year, she found a nonprofit that combined her passion for healthy living and storytelling through graphic design.Eman

Hubbard became the graphic design intern at Lettuce Live Well in January of her junior year at MSU and concluded that portion of her internship in July 2016. She will continue to intern there again when summer begins.

Lettuce Live Well is a nonprofit dedicated to leading community health challenges by providing programs to help those in the community live a healthier life. With a minor in health promotion, Hubbard enjoys helping others through the organization’s different programs.

“I really enjoy going to local schools and talking to kids about health and nutrition,” Hubbard said. “A lot of adults don’t realize how to shop healthy either. At the end of our classes and grocery store tours, we give attendees $5 or $10 to put them through a test to buy healthy on a low budget.”

One of the segments Hubbard enjoyed most was the kids segment of Lettuce Live Well called Little Lettuce League, which was developed in the Journalism 212 2D Animation Storytelling course. MSU journalism animation and comics faculty work with students from majors across campus to find ways to integrate their passion for animation and cartooning into successful careers.

The nonprofit puts together full animation skits where cartoon characters talk about health. She helped make the graphics for these skits. She also created the flyers and graphic work for all of Lettuce Live Well’s events.

“I really like that the internship was with a nonprofit,” Hubbard said. “My boss is very proactive and passionate about the work Lettuce Live Well does. Everyone in the office is extremely health oriented, which is really cool.”

After playing sports during her first few years of college, Hubbard became actively involved in bodybuilding to stay fit and healthy.

“I started eating really well and focusing more on being healthy overall,” Hubbard said. “I wanted to break the stereotypes about bodybuilding. I wanted to explain to women that weight training is healthy and a great way to exercise. Lettuce Live Well personally helped me find balance in my diet, exercise and I feel like I am now more mindful.”

Hubbard said she feels as though many people her age and older want to learn about balancing their wellness goals.

“This internship was so fulfilling. Once I started, I didn't want to leave,” said Hubbard. “At Lettuce Live Well, they help people from every angle surrounding their health. I really like to see people from where they were two months ago in our programs, to where they are now. From this experience, I hope to someday create a nonprofit in Detroit where kids can exercise and gain experience in the health industry.”

Hubbard is also pursuing a minor in Japanese, which came in handy at Lettuce Live Well.

“My interest in Japanese started with growing up in Novi,” Hubbard said. “There is a huge Japanese population and I took Japanese in high school. I wanted to reach out and bridge that gap and learn about a culture that’s not my own. Knowing the Japanese language led me to assisting some people at Lettuce Live Well, who I gave nutrition advice to, because I could speak their language.”

Currently, Hubbard is working on a Flint school project with Katherine Alaimo, a professor in the department of food science and human nutrition. Their group will be talking to sixth grade students in the Flint community and teaching them about Type II Diabetes and the value of nutrition.

“Overall, the internship at Lettuce Live Well made me aware of all aspects of nutrition,” Hubbard said. “It definitely changed my life and I can’t wait to go back.”

By Meg Dedyne

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Senior’s love for television production continued with Windy City Live in Chicago

Posted on: February 23, 2017

valerie
Media and information senior Valerie Dorn was in the eighth grade when she decided she wanted to go into television production. She started in a closet-sized control room and created her own marketing company to learn more about video production. She did this for three years in her community, where she did local video spots.

“I enjoyed video production so much in high school, that I decided to pursue it in college,” Dorn said. “The first thing I ever did was say the pledge of allegiance on camera in middle school and I thought that was the coolest thing. I never thought I would be someday working at an ABC affiliate station in downtown Chicago.”

Dorn wore many hats as a production assistant for the entertainment show, Windy City Live, including meeting celebrity guests, helping to write blogs and scripts, and managing the live audiences. She also helped the director with seating charts and production schedules.

“I think my favorite part of the internship was that I was working for the top third television market in the entire country,” Dorn said. “It was a humbling experience to be able to work for such a large network.”

Dorn has also worked at WKAR since the spring of her sophomore year at MSU and said it gave her a solid foundation for working in television production.

“I owe everything to WKAR,” Dorn said. “They were the first real television studio that I worked in and they really helped me and gave me opportunities to try everything from lighting to floor directing. WKAR is why I had those skills and was confident enough to apply for Windy City Live.”

Dorn is also pursuing a minor in entrepreneurship and innovation with a specialization in television production and media management.

“I’ve always been on the production route, but there’s also a business side to that,” Dorn said. “I heard about the entrepreneurship and innovation minor and figured it was a great opportunity to get a business background.”

She works at WOODTV now as well and handles promotions there.

“I wouldn’t be driving all the way to Grand Rapids every week if I didn’t love it,” Dorn said. “I love how promotions is more hands on and I get to deal with all different departments within a station. I like dealing with clients and the behind the scenes part of it.”

Production is focused on the show, whereas promotions is more creative and out-of-the-box. At WOODTV, Dorn gets to write actual content and do most behind the scenes tasks, which she enjoys.

“I am really looking forward to getting my career started,” Dorn said. “The television experience at Windy City Live was amazing and with television I feel like I have the power to affect someone’s life everyday. Whether it’s making them laugh or feel grateful, it’s just such a powerful medium. It’s amazing what television can do.”

By Meg Dedyne

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ComArtSci student landed internship at Traverse City media company

Posted on: February 16, 2017

kathryn mcLavryCommunication senior Kathryn McLravy immersed herself in the Northern Michigan culture this past summer, as a marketing intern for MyNorth Media in Traverse City. MyNorth Media is a media company that shares stories and photos of life in Northern Michigan, including its publication of print issues such as Traverse Magazine, wedding issues and food issues.

McLravy helped facilitate relationships with other companies in the Traverse City area, planned events and the coordination of other daily and weekly tasks.

“A lot of what I worked on was marketing that MyNorth Media was a part of the local community in Traverse City,” McLravy said. “I would work on how to improve the local hotel advertising and tell them about events that were coming up. It was all about having a symbiotic relationship with others in the community.”

She liked how MyNorth Media wanted to give back to the Traverse City community, not only for tourists, but connecting the community together as a whole. McLravy also enjoyed being up north for the entire summer.

“I actually have a cottage in Northern Michigan, so I knew of MyNorth and the Traverse Magazine,” McLravy said. “It was really cool because whenever I mentioned to someone that I was interning at MyNorth, they would recognize the website and magazine as a good resource for restaurants and events going on in the area.”

MyNorth had posted about the position on their website last spring and McLravy reached out via email and by phone when it took some time to hear back.

“Being persistent and really wanting it definitely paid off in the end,” McLravy said. “I think showing that I was very interested in the position helped. I wasn’t calling everyday, but emailing once in awhile, saying I was looking forward to hearing from them and connecting their company to my experience in Northern Michigan.

The biggest thing she learned during her internship is that there is a strong sense of community surrounding the Traverse City area.

“I didn’t realize the extent of MyNorth’s community involvement,” McLravy said. “MyNorth really tries to connect local businesses with each other and I just learned how connected everything truly is. There is just so much to offer in this area that I didn’t realize.”

Working on email newsletters and learning how to reach out and communicate with others made McLravy interested in this research.

“I thought I would be more interested in event planning,” McLravy said. “But I found through my internship with MyNorth that I actually had more of an interest in the behind the scenes projects and research and how to create the best relationships with local companies.”

McLravy also learned the importance of being persistent when it comes to creating partnerships. It’s not as simple as just asking. It takes working out benefits between both companies and establishing an effective language.

Her advice? Visit the ComArtSci Career Center and ask for help.

“As someone who also works in the career center, there are so many resources people can take advantage of,” McLravy said. “Even just getting your resume looked at is a good step. There is always someone there to help you. If you need advice about something, don’t be afraid to ask. People are afraid of being too forward, but it’s okay to ask for help.”

By Meg Dedyne

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Award-winning MSU film student pursues passion in New York City

Posted on: February 9, 2017

livLiv Larsen had an extraordinary senior year at Michigan State University — to say the least. The former journalism student, with a minor in documentary film studies, along with her crew produced a documentary called “From Flint” that won a student academy award in 2016.

In May, Larsen moved to New York City to fulfill her passion of working for a production company at 4th Row Films. As a production intern, she was assigned three documentaries to work on. She came up with different ideas for the director and tried to put her spin on the little details when she saw an opportunity. She even got to attend a few of the shoots.

“I really got to see first hand how different people interview,” Larsen said. “The director’s style was different from my style and I was able to see how to set up the whole production in the real world.”

She excels at the logistics behind the shoot, “Whether it’s applying for grants, setting up the location or making sure everyone’s on the same page; I really enjoy these aspects,” said Larsen.

Larsen claims that her favorite part of the internship was collaborating with other interns.

“The interns pretty much got free reign to give ideas,” Larsen said. “It was great to have that group and connection, in case we wanted to collaborate on future projects together.”

To her surprise, after completing her internship in New York City, Larsen found herself wanting to try her hand in independent filmmaking. After completing her award-winning documentary in Professor Bob Albers’ class, she thought she wanted to work for a large production company, shooting films, but realized that she had a desire to pursue her own personal film style.

“I don’t think I would be where I am today if it wasn’t for my student film,” Larsen said. “After it won a Student Academy Award, our crew filed to work with an actual distribution company, which is amazing.”

Larsen said no member of her crew had actually been to Flint before creating this film. The main task of the film was to see how they could get involved with the community of Flint and make an impact.

“After doing basic internet research, we met with a few people, which turned into more people,” Larsen said. “The film started to unfold and the community of Flint embraced us with open arms. Our crew just took it one step at a time. The whole thing was a puzzle we put together, since we only had a semester to do it. It was so rewarding at the end.”

Currently, Larsen is still living in New York City, pursuing her dream of independent filmmaking. She's doing freelance work, which involved working on a project for Netflix, and currently producing another independent documentary film.

Her interest in documentary filmmaking evolved over time as she added new skills and learned more about the field.

“I have always been involved in the arts as a kid,” Larsen said. “Then I came to MSU and I had my journalism major, but I wasn’t completely satisfied with just that. After joining Telecasters and SideShow, I wanted to get more involved.”

Larsen always liked documentaries because they went further into telling stories and resonated with people a little more. She enjoys how one documentary can cover so much and bring out the layers of an issue.

She said the difference between her crew’s coverage of Flint and every other major news outlet was their angle. The networks were covering the city of Flint based on the government. Larsen and her crew covered Flint based on the people.

“Everybody can relate to someone else,” Larsen said. “You can emphasize with someone and try to understand their tragedy. Everyone has a story worth telling. So to me, it’s a mission to find these stories that are untold and tell them in a way that’s never been done before.”

By Meg Dedyne

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Communication senior blends two passions into one internship

Posted on: January 26, 2017

laurentamboerPassionate about the environment doesn’t even begin to describe communication senior Lauren Tamboer and the work she is doing as a communications intern at MSU Sustainability.

She is pursuing a minor in environmental and sustainability studies, a decision that she said was inspired by her father.

“My Dad has definitely had an influence on my interest in the environment,” Tamboer said. “He was always asking, ‘What tree is this?’ ‘What animal is that?’,” Tamboer said. “The environmental classes (at MSU) also keep my interest ... I hope to dedicate my career in some type of way to the study of sustainability.”

The internship with MSU Sustainability is a year-long position. Tamboer said she has already learned so much. She runs all of the “Be Spartan Green” social media accounts, developing content and monitoring channels. She also creates the content for the newsletter that goes out every month. She contributes a story of her own to the newsletter, which requires her to research and brainstorm as well as interview a subject matter expert.

Sometimes, she interviews professors or researchers for these stories. They are all based on environmental topics, community engagement and sustainability.

“I have a really strong personal connection to sustainability, which makes this job fun for me,” Tamboer said. “The environment is one of the issues I care most about and one of the most pressing issues in the world. Our generation is really receptive to these issues and there is a lot of research being done here at MSU. Seeing other people’s passion about it, gives me passion about it, too.”

Her passion led her to seek out more information and eventually to her internship.

“I followed ‘Be Spartan Green’ on social media and they always keep all of their channels updated with positions,” Tamboer said. “I wanted an internship that combined my passions for communication and the environment and when I heard about this job and the content I would be writing, this sounded exactly like what I was looking for.”

Tamboer found the job on MySpartanCareer, the career network website replaced by Handshake, and formally applied.

“When they offered me the job, I accepted right away,” Tamboer said. “I knew it would be a good fit.”

In addition to working on issues that matter so much to her, she said her favorite part of the job is the people.

“They really make it,” Tamboer said. “Everything is collaborative and they value my opinion. I know that it’s okay to try things out and make mistakes. When other people care about sustainability, it makes the collaboration so worthwhile.”

For those who don’t exactly know what sustainability means, Tamboer describes the term as living a lifestyle using resources in a way that allows future generations to use our future resources.

“We cover water, transportation and campus environment. Sustainability on campus is the ultimate goal,” Tamboer said. “We focus on the community message of sustainability and send the message out to university facilities. We also try to focus on including students in the sustainability conversation so they can share their own impact on campus.”

Tamboer said this internship has solidified that she wants to further pursue environmental communications. This field keeps her excited about a future career. Her advice for searching for that perfect job or internship is to be selective.

“It’s about paying close attention to where you would want to work and what content they are creating,” Tamboer said. “It’s challenging to find something that blends all of your passions together, but it definitely comes around if you just keep looking.”

By Meg Dedyne

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